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Her family farm once belonged to the Kaw Indians. She decided to pay them back.

February 16, 2019
Florence Schloneger, left, is donating a portion of her farm sale proceeds to the Kanza Heritage Society, a non-profit organization whose mission is to preserve the Kaw cultural and heritage. Schloneger’s family owned the farm in south McPherson county for five generations and it sat on the edge of land that was historically Kaw hunting grounds. Pauline Sharp, right, is with the Kanza Heritage Society.

Florence Schloneger, left, is donating a portion of her farm sale proceeds to the Kanza Heritage Society, a non-profit organization whose mission is to preserve the Kaw cultural and heritage. Schloneger’s family owned the farm in south McPherson county for five generations and it sat on the edge of land that was historically Kaw hunting grounds. Pauline Sharp, right, is with the Kanza Heritage Society.

Back in 1879, Henrich Gronemann was a German Lutheran who homesteaded on the far southeast corner of McPherson County, near the borders of Harvey and Marion County.

His 320-acres of prairie was filled with creeks and rolling hills that previously had been the hunting grounds of the Kaw, or Kanza, Indians.

Now, 140 years and five generations later, his great-great granddaughter has done something unthinkable.

So begins Becky Tanner’s story for the Wichita Eagle. You may read the rest of the story here.

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Alaska After the Quake

December 12, 2018
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HOMER, ALASKA—I rode out last Friday’s earthquake under the dining room table. My sister-in-law had arrived the night before from Philadelphia for a two-week visit. I made her crouch under the table with me. Her eyes were wide. I wondered: How much longer will this go on?

So begins Miranda Weiss’s musings on living in Alaska with earthquakes and climate change. You may read the rest of her American Scholar post here.

THE WOMEN WHO BUILT MAYO CLINIC

November 26, 2018

Alice Magaw (right) in surgery with Sister Joseph Dempsey and Dr. William Mayo. Courtesy of the Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research.

Several years ago, a few colleagues and I discovered a well-kept secret about Mayo Clinic, where we all worked.

We had decided to create a Jeopardy game for Women’s History Month based on women who were involved in the early years of the physician’s practice that evolved into our internationally renowned academic medical center. I offered to visit the clinic’s historical archive, expecting to glean a few little-known facts about the handful of women who were staples of the organization’s 150-year-old history.

To my surprise, the staff in the archive brought me lists, files, and boxes of information about many women I never had heard of before. As a native of Rochester, Minnesota, where the clinic originated, and as an employee for nearly two decades, I was mystified as to how I missed knowing about these women and their important contributions.

So begins Virginia Wright-Peterson’s fascinating post about the beginnings of Mayo Clinic. You may read the entire Zocalo post here.

Omaha tribe works to save historic Walthill hospital built by first Native American doctor

August 26, 2018

Buffalo Doug

Susan LaFlesche Picotte Memorial Hospital

Dolly A. Butz has a report in the Sioux City Journal about efforts to fundraise and restore a historical hospital on the Omaha Reservation in Walthill, NE. Dr. Susan LaFlesche Picotte, a Presbyterian, built it in 1912. You can read more about it all here.

Also, see my earlier post on Susan LaFlesche Picotte.

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Where to Find God

August 11, 2018

I grew up in Rapid City, South Dakota, near the edge of the Black Hills. Just behind my home was a church building that housed a number of different congregations over the years – a white evangelical church, a Native Christian church, a Lutheran church, and now, the last I checked, an Orthodox church.

As I grew up, the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit met me in conversations with my parents, in an Evangelical Free basement after Awana, during an Assemblies of God worship service, and at youth group meetings at Hope Christian Reformed Church. While the Reformed tradition has a hold on me, these other traditions (and more) also play a role in how I see God at work.

So begins Northwestern College alum Keith Starkenburg’s reflections on “place” and the sacred. You may read his entire piece at The Twelve here.

In this rapaciously dry year, a quiet question grows louder: What are we doing here?

August 10, 2018

Four years ago, my fiancé, Colin, and I decided to move to New Mexico. We had been living in a secluded river valley in western Colorado, but both of us were venturing into self-employment and thought it’d be easier in a bigger town. So we rigged our pickup with a load the Beverly Hillbillies would have admired — furniture, lamps, buckets full of pottery glaze — and drove south. We crossed the Chama River, turned left into the Española Valley, and stopped at a Lotaburger for the cheap thrill of green chile on a fast-food cheeseburger. The burger was bad but the chile was hot, and I was happy. I’d waited my whole life to make this move.

So begins Cally Carswell’s fine essay on drought and a place–Santa Fe, New Mexico. You may read the rest of her High Country News piece here.

IN KOTZEBUE, ALASKA, HUNTERS ARE BRINGING TRADITIONAL FOODS—AND A SENSE OF COMFORT—TO THEIR LOCAL ELDERS

July 17, 2018

An aerial view of Kotzebue, Alaska.

Twenty-six miles above the Arctic Circle, in Kotzebue, Alaska, there’s a plain white metal trailer in the center of town that blends in with the snowy tundra during the winter. From the outside, it looks like an office or a perhaps a single-family home, but it’s actually a modern-day ice-cellar, or Siglauq, where hunters from across Inuit villages throughout northern Alaska can donate meat to be inspected, packaged, and served in the northernmost nursing home in the United States.

So begins Charlee Catherine Dyrhoff’s Pacific Standard story on providing traditional food for Inuit elderly in the Alaskan town of Kotzebue. You may read the entire story here.

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